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-rw-r--r--Documentation/power/devices.txt118
1 files changed, 75 insertions, 43 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/power/devices.txt b/Documentation/power/devices.txt
index 646a89e0c07..20af7def23c 100644
--- a/Documentation/power/devices.txt
+++ b/Documentation/power/devices.txt
@@ -123,9 +123,12 @@ please refer directly to the source code for more information about it.
Subsystem-Level Methods
-----------------------
The core methods to suspend and resume devices reside in struct dev_pm_ops
-pointed to by the pm member of struct bus_type, struct device_type and
-struct class. They are mostly of interest to the people writing infrastructure
-for buses, like PCI or USB, or device type and device class drivers.
+pointed to by the ops member of struct dev_pm_domain, or by the pm member of
+struct bus_type, struct device_type and struct class. They are mostly of
+interest to the people writing infrastructure for platforms and buses, like PCI
+or USB, or device type and device class drivers. They also are relevant to the
+writers of device drivers whose subsystems (PM domains, device types, device
+classes and bus types) don't provide all power management methods.
Bus drivers implement these methods as appropriate for the hardware and the
drivers using it; PCI works differently from USB, and so on. Not many people
@@ -139,41 +142,57 @@ sequencing in the driver model tree.
/sys/devices/.../power/wakeup files
-----------------------------------
-All devices in the driver model have two flags to control handling of wakeup
-events (hardware signals that can force the device and/or system out of a low
-power state). These flags are initialized by bus or device driver code using
+All device objects in the driver model contain fields that control the handling
+of system wakeup events (hardware signals that can force the system out of a
+sleep state). These fields are initialized by bus or device driver code using
device_set_wakeup_capable() and device_set_wakeup_enable(), defined in
include/linux/pm_wakeup.h.
-The "can_wakeup" flag just records whether the device (and its driver) can
+The "power.can_wakeup" flag just records whether the device (and its driver) can
physically support wakeup events. The device_set_wakeup_capable() routine
-affects this flag. The "should_wakeup" flag controls whether the device should
-try to use its wakeup mechanism. device_set_wakeup_enable() affects this flag;
-for the most part drivers should not change its value. The initial value of
-should_wakeup is supposed to be false for the majority of devices; the major
-exceptions are power buttons, keyboards, and Ethernet adapters whose WoL
-(wake-on-LAN) feature has been set up with ethtool. It should also default
-to true for devices that don't generate wakeup requests on their own but merely
-forward wakeup requests from one bus to another (like PCI bridges).
+affects this flag. The "power.wakeup" field is a pointer to an object of type
+struct wakeup_source used for controlling whether or not the device should use
+its system wakeup mechanism and for notifying the PM core of system wakeup
+events signaled by the device. This object is only present for wakeup-capable
+devices (i.e. devices whose "can_wakeup" flags are set) and is created (or
+removed) by device_set_wakeup_capable().
Whether or not a device is capable of issuing wakeup events is a hardware
matter, and the kernel is responsible for keeping track of it. By contrast,
whether or not a wakeup-capable device should issue wakeup events is a policy
decision, and it is managed by user space through a sysfs attribute: the
-power/wakeup file. User space can write the strings "enabled" or "disabled" to
-set or clear the "should_wakeup" flag, respectively. This file is only present
-for wakeup-capable devices (i.e. devices whose "can_wakeup" flags are set)
-and is created (or removed) by device_set_wakeup_capable(). Reads from the
-file will return the corresponding string.
-
-The device_may_wakeup() routine returns true only if both flags are set.
+"power/wakeup" file. User space can write the strings "enabled" or "disabled"
+to it to indicate whether or not, respectively, the device is supposed to signal
+system wakeup. This file is only present if the "power.wakeup" object exists
+for the given device and is created (or removed) along with that object, by
+device_set_wakeup_capable(). Reads from the file will return the corresponding
+string.
+
+The "power/wakeup" file is supposed to contain the "disabled" string initially
+for the majority of devices; the major exceptions are power buttons, keyboards,
+and Ethernet adapters whose WoL (wake-on-LAN) feature has been set up with
+ethtool. It should also default to "enabled" for devices that don't generate
+wakeup requests on their own but merely forward wakeup requests from one bus to
+another (like PCI Express ports).
+
+The device_may_wakeup() routine returns true only if the "power.wakeup" object
+exists and the corresponding "power/wakeup" file contains the string "enabled".
This information is used by subsystems, like the PCI bus type code, to see
whether or not to enable the devices' wakeup mechanisms. If device wakeup
mechanisms are enabled or disabled directly by drivers, they also should use
device_may_wakeup() to decide what to do during a system sleep transition.
-However for runtime power management, wakeup events should be enabled whenever
-the device and driver both support them, regardless of the should_wakeup flag.
-
+Device drivers, however, are not supposed to call device_set_wakeup_enable()
+directly in any case.
+
+It ought to be noted that system wakeup is conceptually different from "remote
+wakeup" used by runtime power management, although it may be supported by the
+same physical mechanism. Remote wakeup is a feature allowing devices in
+low-power states to trigger specific interrupts to signal conditions in which
+they should be put into the full-power state. Those interrupts may or may not
+be used to signal system wakeup events, depending on the hardware design. On
+some systems it is impossible to trigger them from system sleep states. In any
+case, remote wakeup should always be enabled for runtime power management for
+all devices and drivers that support it.
/sys/devices/.../power/control files
------------------------------------
@@ -249,23 +268,37 @@ for every device before the next phase begins. Not all busses or classes
support all these callbacks and not all drivers use all the callbacks. The
various phases always run after tasks have been frozen and before they are
unfrozen. Furthermore, the *_noirq phases run at a time when IRQ handlers have
-been disabled (except for those marked with the IRQ_WAKEUP flag).
+been disabled (except for those marked with the IRQF_NO_SUSPEND flag).
+
+All phases use PM domain, bus, type, class or driver callbacks (that is, methods
+defined in dev->pm_domain->ops, dev->bus->pm, dev->type->pm, dev->class->pm or
+dev->driver->pm). These callbacks are regarded by the PM core as mutually
+exclusive. Moreover, PM domain callbacks always take precedence over all of the
+other callbacks and, for example, type callbacks take precedence over bus, class
+and driver callbacks. To be precise, the following rules are used to determine
+which callback to execute in the given phase:
+
+ 1. If dev->pm_domain is present, the PM core will choose the callback
+ included in dev->pm_domain->ops for execution
+
+ 2. Otherwise, if both dev->type and dev->type->pm are present, the callback
+ included in dev->type->pm will be chosen for execution.
+
+ 3. Otherwise, if both dev->class and dev->class->pm are present, the
+ callback included in dev->class->pm will be chosen for execution.
+
+ 4. Otherwise, if both dev->bus and dev->bus->pm are present, the callback
+ included in dev->bus->pm will be chosen for execution.
+
+This allows PM domains and device types to override callbacks provided by bus
+types or device classes if necessary.
-All phases use bus, type, or class callbacks (that is, methods defined in
-dev->bus->pm, dev->type->pm, or dev->class->pm). These callbacks are mutually
-exclusive, so if the device type provides a struct dev_pm_ops object pointed to
-by its pm field (i.e. both dev->type and dev->type->pm are defined), the
-callbacks included in that object (i.e. dev->type->pm) will be used. Otherwise,
-if the class provides a struct dev_pm_ops object pointed to by its pm field
-(i.e. both dev->class and dev->class->pm are defined), the PM core will use the
-callbacks from that object (i.e. dev->class->pm). Finally, if the pm fields of
-both the device type and class objects are NULL (or those objects do not exist),
-the callbacks provided by the bus (that is, the callbacks from dev->bus->pm)
-will be used (this allows device types to override callbacks provided by bus
-types or classes if necessary).
+The PM domain, type, class and bus callbacks may in turn invoke device- or
+driver-specific methods stored in dev->driver->pm, but they don't have to do
+that.
-These callbacks may in turn invoke device- or driver-specific methods stored in
-dev->driver->pm, but they don't have to.
+If the subsystem callback chosen for execution is not present, the PM core will
+execute the corresponding method from dev->driver->pm instead if there is one.
Entering System Suspend
@@ -283,9 +316,8 @@ When the system goes into the standby or memory sleep state, the phases are:
After the prepare callback method returns, no new children may be
registered below the device. The method may also prepare the device or
- driver in some way for the upcoming system power transition (for
- example, by allocating additional memory required for this purpose), but
- it should not put the device into a low-power state.
+ driver in some way for the upcoming system power transition, but it
+ should not put the device into a low-power state.
2. The suspend methods should quiesce the device to stop it from performing
I/O. They also may save the device registers and put it into the